The Path of Love

The longing to return to the Arms of the Beloved is at the root of every emotion, every desire that we have.

This is inclusive of every romantic notion, every melancholic yearning for a lost or current love, every Bhakti moment at the feet of the Master.

The draw of death and the desire to return to the womb are but misplaced yearnings born of our having forgotten that we are in fact, in every moment One with All Things – that there is no separation.

To truly know this arrests all, as Beauty arrests motion. Remembrance is the most profound of all spiritual practices.

The heart does know, what the head does not.

The Beloved is ever with me and I and the Beloved are One.

Ishq allah ma’bud allah – God is Love, Lover, and Beloved.

This life is indeed The Path of Love.

Be in Love.

Be Love.

Love.

Esther Perel: The secret to desire in a long-term relationship

In long-term relationships, we often expect our beloved to be both best friend and erotic partner. But as Esther Perel argues, good and committed sex draws on two conflicting needs: our need for security and our need for surprise. So how do you sustain desire? With wit and eloquence, Perel lets us in on the mystery of erotic intelligence.

Be Conscious at Every Breath

I received many years ago via oral transmission that the first rule of the Khwajagan is to be “Present at Every Breath”. When I first heard it, I did not know how to spell Khwajagan, who the Khwajagan were, or how to verify the information. Now with the advent of Google, its spell check, and memory of the phrase, I have discovered not only who the Khawjagan are purported to be [a chain of Central Asian Naqshbandi Sufi Masters from the 10th to the 16th century], who they influenced [Gurdjieff’s ‘Fourth Way’ originated with the Khwajagan], but some of their other rules. Not unlike other oral traditions that are hitting the internet this is not readily verifiable, but the rules do seem to pass the litmus test for “Way Above Average”.

Find the first and the other listed rules of the Khwajagan here.

Married, with Infidelities–Dan Savage on the Virtues of Infidelity

What is the benefit of marriage? … stability.  The rest is negotiable.

New York Times contributor, Mark Oppenheimer, introduces us to the work of Dan Savage who has much to say about the contemporary outer limits of committed relationship.

Go here and learn the advantages of good, giving, and game and so much more.