Masters of Love – The Secret of Lasting Relationships

Just how kind and generous are you in your couple? Would you consciously condemn your partner to greater susceptibility to chronic or disabling disease by withholding kindness and/or generosity?

“People who give their partner the cold shoulder — deliberately ignoring the partner or responding minimally — damage the relationship by making their partner feel worthless and invisible, as if they’re not there, not valued. And people who treat their partners with contempt and criticize them not only kill the love in the relationship, but they also kill their partner’s ability to fight off viruses and cancers. Being mean is the death knell of relationships.

“Kindness, on the other hand, glues couples together. Research independent from theirs has shown that kindness (along with emotional stability) is the most important predictor of satisfaction and stability in a marriage. Kindness makes each partner feel cared for, understood, and validated—feel loved. “My bounty is as boundless as the sea,” says Shakespeare’s Juliet. “My love as deep; the more I give to thee, / The more I have, for both are infinite.” That’s how kindness works too: there’s a great deal of evidence showing the more someone receives or witnesses kindness, the more they will be kind themselves, which leads to upward spirals of love and generosity in a relationship.”

Examine the whole of this compelling article by Emily Esfahani Smith here.

MENTAL HEALTH ADVANCE DIRECTIVES A User Guide for Maine Consumers

You can have it any way your want it.  Know your rights.  If you are concerned about your psychiatric care during a hospitalization, then you should familiarize yourself with this work.  Click the cover of the booklet below to explore or click here.

Image

Are we over-diagnosing mental illness?

by Katti Gray, Special to CNN

  • Experts say normal responses to life’s challenges are too often labeled disorders.
  • Diagnoses have needlessly skyrocketed, say critics of a diagnostic manual.
  • The American Psychiatric Association says critics are overly alarmed.

For this enlightening and provocative article go here.

The Best Strategy for Reducing Stress – You have two choices: Either change the reality around you or change your expectations.

Monkey Knot

Peter Bregman, the author of 18 Minutes: Find Your Focus, Master Distraction, and Get the Right Things Done, due out in September, and Point B: A Short Guide to Leading a Big Change, has a great article on Psychology Today Online.  Herein he explains the dissonance between anticipations and expectations as the greatest source of anxiety and stress.  To read the article go here.

Married, with Infidelities–Dan Savage on the Virtues of Infidelity

What is the benefit of marriage? … stability.  The rest is negotiable.

New York Times contributor, Mark Oppenheimer, introduces us to the work of Dan Savage who has much to say about the contemporary outer limits of committed relationship.

Go here and learn the advantages of good, giving, and game and so much more.

Music Training May Delay Hearing and Memory Loss

A new study suggests lifelong musical experiences can retard certain aspects of the aging process. Specifically, Northwestern University scientists discovered a lifetime of musical training slows some aspects of hearing and memory loss.

The experts believe the findings suggest age-related delays in neural timing (the ability of the brain to decode and then recode audio stimuli) are not inevitable and can be avoided or offset with musical training.

The study is the first to provide biological evidence that lifelong musical experience has an impact on the aging process.

For the rest of this PsychCentral.com article go here.