Masters of Love – The Secret of Lasting Relationships

Just how kind and generous are you in your couple? Would you consciously condemn your partner to greater susceptibility to chronic or disabling disease by withholding kindness and/or generosity?

“People who give their partner the cold shoulder — deliberately ignoring the partner or responding minimally — damage the relationship by making their partner feel worthless and invisible, as if they’re not there, not valued. And people who treat their partners with contempt and criticize them not only kill the love in the relationship, but they also kill their partner’s ability to fight off viruses and cancers. Being mean is the death knell of relationships.

“Kindness, on the other hand, glues couples together. Research independent from theirs has shown that kindness (along with emotional stability) is the most important predictor of satisfaction and stability in a marriage. Kindness makes each partner feel cared for, understood, and validated—feel loved. “My bounty is as boundless as the sea,” says Shakespeare’s Juliet. “My love as deep; the more I give to thee, / The more I have, for both are infinite.” That’s how kindness works too: there’s a great deal of evidence showing the more someone receives or witnesses kindness, the more they will be kind themselves, which leads to upward spirals of love and generosity in a relationship.”

Examine the whole of this compelling article by Emily Esfahani Smith here.

Married, with Infidelities–Dan Savage on the Virtues of Infidelity

What is the benefit of marriage? … stability.  The rest is negotiable.

New York Times contributor, Mark Oppenheimer, introduces us to the work of Dan Savage who has much to say about the contemporary outer limits of committed relationship.

Go here and learn the advantages of good, giving, and game and so much more.

Brain Study Reveals Secrets of Staying Madly in Love

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Researchers compared the brain scans of long-term married individuals to the scans of individuals who have recently fallen in love. Surprisingly, the results revealed similar activity in specific brain regions for both long-term, intense romantic love and couples in early-stage romantic love. These particular brain regions could be the clue to why certain couples stay madly in love years, even decades, later.

For the entire online Psychology Today article go HERE